About your Search

20110201
20110228
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
wrote this book called "kabuki democracy" the system vs. barack obama" originally when i talked about this book in washington i thought i may have to explain no, i do not think obama lurched too far to the left and has to be brought back to the right. that is the narrative. where was i? here is the thing. barack obama invited me to dinner in 2005 and i really did not have a strong opinion of the guy going in. i did not want to this is speech in 2004 i was playing poker that night. because i never watch a convention because it is either great and depress he is not the nominee like it would have been a -- would have been. so it did not matter. you might as well have fun. i did not see it but i wind had dinner completely cold. i heard nice things but nothing specific. i was blown away by his boys, self-confidence, and good humor and strong progressive orientation and remember leaving the restaurant walking around a neighborhood in washington d.c. may be thinking my daughter who at the time was seven, would one day be able to vote for this man in the presidential election. i never imagine
at brooklyn college and cuny graduate school. he claims president obama has been unable to deliver on his campaign pledges. mr. alterman points to the american political system as the main obstacle in preventing passage of a more progressive agenda. eric alterman discusses his book at busboys and poets in washington, d.c. the program is just over an hour. >> the right wing that i am these days. a did a tour a few years ago, everywhere i went someone would call up the bookstore and say that i was sick and i had to cancel. and when i was doing a bookstore in l.a., they called c-span to cancel and c-span called me and said, you know, we're sorry you're sick and i said, well, i'm not sick. and the event went on but somebody killed all the electricity in the store while i was speaking. and it was one of those stores i don't want to disparage hippies or anything but -- it was one of those stores where nobody knew where the fuse box was. [laughter] so i had to hold the audience for 45 minutes while they found out how to get the electricity back on. [laughter] >> and i don't have 45 minutes worth
by saying a few things about president obama and his the engagement strategy because his readiness to talk to the end of me was one of the most distinguishing features of his presidential campaign and reset with russia and trying to negotiate and trying to reach out to syria is unusual foreign policy. i want to offer some thoughts on how the average has gone and where it is likely to head in the months ahead. for starters coming in trying to answer the question when and why, i went back through history to find as many cases as i could wear longstanding rivals found their way to peace. the earliest case and look at is the foundation of switzerland where what is today the alpine region region, along and a maze of each other what became a swiss confederation, i look at the formation of a iroquois a confederacy which was born in 1450 in a small town that still exist today when the five iroquois a tribes came together they were killing each other literally for centuries from 14531777 of the single iroquois tribe died in battle with another iroquois. 1853 as system that preserve peace among the
president obama and his engagement strategy because his readiness to talk to the enemy was in some ways one of the most distinguishing features of his presidential campaign and also of his time as president. reset with russia, reaching out to cuba, trying to negotiate with ron, trying to reach out to syria. this is an unusual form policy. a lot to offer some thoughts on how that every test on and where it is likely to head in the months ahead. so, for starters in trying to answer this question when and why peace breaks out i went back and just wait widely through history where longstanding rivals found their way to peace. they moved from india to amity. the earliest case i looked at is the foundation of switzerland in 1291 when three in what is today the alpine region, along enemies of its other forms when it became the swiss confederation. i look at the formation of the iroquois confederacy in upstate new york which was born in 1450 in the small town that still exists today. these five tribes came together. they had been killing each other and eating each of the literally for centuries. fr
about president obama and his engagement strategy. because his readiness to talk to the enemy was in some ways one the most distinguishing features of his presidential campaign and also of his time as president. reset with russia, reaching out to cuba, trying to negotiation with iran, trying to reach out to syria. this is an unusual foreign policy. so i want to offer some thoughts on how that outreach has gone and where it's likely to head in the months ahead. so for starters, i'm trying to answer this question when and why peace breaks out, i went back and i just read widely through history to find as many cases that i could where long standing rivals found their way to peace. where they moved from entity to antty. the earlier case i look at is the foundation of switzerland in 1291. where three forests in the alpine region long enemies of each other formed what became the swiss confederation. i look at the formation of the indians in upstate new york which was born in 1450 in a small town that still exists today. when the tribes came together, they had been killing each other
about president obama and his engagement strategy because his readiness to talk to the enemy was, in some ways, one of the most distinguishing features of his presidential campaign and also of his time as president. reaching out to cuba, trying to negotiate with tirana, trying to reach out to syria. this is an unusual foreign-policy. and so i want to offer some thoughts on how that out reaches don and where it is likely to head in the months ahead. so, for starters, in trying to answer this question when and why peace breaks out i went back and read widely through history to find as many cases as i could where longstanding rivals found their way to peace, where they moved from anna .. and eddie. the earliest case i looked at is the foundation of switzerland in 1291 when three cantons in what is today the alpine region, longer enemies of each other, formed what became the swiss confederation. i looked at the formation of the iroquois confederacy in upstate new york which was born in 1450 in a small town that still exists today. these five iroquois tribes came together that have be
election he warned that barack obama's presidency would be like a jimmy carter second term. the joke didn't need any explanation. democrats responded to the differences between obama and president carter, not by defending the former president. even if carter became known for having one of the most active post presidential careers in american history, his time in the white house has remained a symbol of failed presidential leadership. over the past few months there have been many commentators who have compared obama to carter rather than fdr, and the nuns or ronald reagan. the point is clear. in contemporary political debate and in most history textbooks carter is consistently remembered as a president who failed to articulate a compelling political vision and who was unable to hold his party together. the image of a worn down carter hold up in the white house desperately trying to resolve the iran hostage crisis in to the final hours of his term became almost as iconic as the images of president john f. kennedy huddled with his brother robert trying to avert a nuclear war during the cuban
's expectations. even president obama has said many times things about your father as a leader and as president, which is why i was interested in one of the other things he wrote in the book. he said given the fact of republican hopes of reagan as the one piece of common ground that a few nights the whole republican party, you write in the book ronald reagan couldn't have won the republican nomination today. what you mean by that? >> guest: what i mean by that -- i had this conversation with new gingrich awhile back and i said it's interesting that the liberals seem to only need ideology to follow. conservatives are always looking for someone to lead them. and if that person isn't there then they break into factions. and you get all these different fiefdoms, factions all over the map. and so what i say is ronald reagan is never president and he throws his hat into the ring in 2008 for 2012, who would in fact attack him because all you can look it is the gubernatorial years, say no fault divorce. raised taxes, an abortion bill. my god, he was a union leader. now, so you sit there and think about
and liberalism? >> guest: i don't think it is liberalism. it has come to me and social democracy. and obama approved it this time around. it has been less then liberal for a long time. liberal is the liberalism of john locke and subsequent liberals. nineteenth century liberals. i am a nineteenth century liberal but we have been coopted by liberalism. at some point in the progressive movement the progressives took the word liberal and used it for their own purposes. will liberals of the american experience are the liberals of the founding fathers and the liberals of the conservative movement. we are real liberals but this is an argument that will take a long time to workout. >> host: in your 1992 book "the clinton crackup" you said given the right disposition a liberal can be a conservative and a conservative can be a liberal. why have more students of politics not made this conciliatory point? >> i am afraid that politics today, the lines are drawn and you are either on my side or their side. that is a shame. in the 20s people could be liberal on some things and conservative on other things
, was progressive spur obama. i'm always understand progressives and liberals to be on the left. not the communist left. there's the full spectrum. you have the very far left, marxist, lennonist, then you move over, democratic socialist. this group progressives for obama, one the initiators was the one who wrote the statement. one the 99 signers was jane fonda. we know what happened with vietnam. mark rudd who was in sds in columbia. i mean a lot of the people, they weren't just student radicals, they were communist. they were followers of fidel, or mark rudd in his book "underground" said that michael clonsky was a stalinist. it's amazing how many people won that are in academia. they are now out calling themselves progressives for obama. and so what do they really believe. are they now just lifting the progressive label? have they changed their views? it's hard to say. i quote in the book, fascinating assessment from mark rudd of the 2008 election where rudd says, you know, obama, he did it. he did it. he didn't blow it. he said just the right things and took the right policy positions to be abl
president obama had an interesting question when he came into office, how to define the war, the war until. i think the liberal side of the democratic party would have likened him to redefine. i think that would be naÏve on multiple levels for store. al qaeda has been a war with us since 1998 when they blew up our embassies in africa. they declared war on us. big guns warlike things for us to kind of weekend it is a war. i think would be wrong. on the other hand, acting president george w. bush, he also overestimate the problem. al qaeda is a service problem that it's not more so. i don't think we have the language to explain it exactly because it is a form of warfare but the newest form of warfare in terms of american historical terms is perhaps the war of the pars in the late 18th century. which was a war but it wasn't an interstate war. and it wasn't, you know, going to destroy the republic. >> host: one of the difficulties of naming it, we weren't afraid to say indian wars were as since 9/11 we've essentially been afraid to say islamist wars because of the war on islam in because that
president of the united states, barack obama. that was in obama's years in the latter 1970s in hawaii. and i first started reading about frank marshall davis and obama in 2007/2008. i heard conservatives on talk radio, on blogs and elsewhere saying frank marshall davis was a communist, a party member. he influenced obama. and meanwhile while i'm hearing all of this stuff i have spread all over my desk all these committee reports, right? senate judiciary committee run by democrats because. house committee internal security run by democrats, house committee un-american activities. run by democrats. most of these people who ran these committees were democrats. chris dodd's father, thomas dodd, right? francis walter, representative i-court, jack kennedy was an anticommunist on some of these committees. so i hear this and i'm thinking, okay, what does he really believe? what does davis really believe? and how close was he to obama? august 2nd, 2008, a.p. piece, davis was a constant figure in obama's early life. he was an important influence to obama looked to like a father, a mentor for advice on
universal health care. >> yes, sir. >> caller:... [inaudible]. i gather that mr. tyrrell, still... obama care and wonder why the u.s. is so... [inaudible]. >> doctor, are you in favor of the health care plan, that passed last year? >> caller: i am... the obama health care plan, i think it did only a partial, partially satisfactory and would prefer something more on the style of the european or japanese plan or the canadian plan. >> thank you, sir. >> well, rights now, the japanese and europeans are fixing up their entitlement expense and they have a huge ex-suspension and are rioting in the streets. we don't have that yet and we can still avoid it and we can provide health care through private -- through the private medical system that is far more efficient and effective than obamacare. so, i'm going to stick with the future that works. privatization. i hope we don't go into public health care, because, i think that it would just, if you want to know what -- where it leads, well, it leads to greece, to spain, and, right now, they are faced with the terrible problem. and we have -- don't
gather that mr. tyrrell, still... obama care and wonder why the u.s. is so... [inaudible]. >> doctor, are you in favor of the health care plan, that passed last year? >> caller: i am... the obama health care plan, i think it did only a partial, partially satisfactory and would prefer something more on the style of the european or japanese plan or the canadian plan. >> thank you, sir. >> well, rights now, the japanese and europeans are fixing up their entitlement expense and they have a huge ex-suspension and are rioting in the streets. we don't have that yet and we can still avoid it and we can provide health care through private -- through the private medical system that is far more efficient and effective than obamacare. so, i'm going to stick with the future that works. privatization. i hope we don't go into public health care, because, i think that it would just, if you want to know what -- where it leads, well, it leads to greece, to spain, and, right now, they are faced with the terrible problem. and we have -- don't have that problem yet. and, it is not too late to avoid that
to clinton to george w. bush to barack obama, americans have been told they were at war because al qaeda and its allies are motivated by hatred for liberty, way of life and space institutions. this is a palpable and lethal why. we are being attacked because of the half century relentless innovation and the muslim world. it is in the can of the defense pact 50 years of intervention that we find the main motivation of america's islamist enemies as well as the principal organizational glue that provides the modicum of unity to the movements always fragile cohesion. the islamist motivation is to be found in the perception of u.s. foreign policy as an attack on the islamic religion and its followers. this is a view that is held not only by those carrying the ak-47s, but its extensive polling by reliable western pollsters as reliable by nearly 80% of all muslims worldwide, young and old, moderate and militant, men and women. nell minnow american must accept the islamist indictment of the entire muslim intent of the foreign policy. but to defeat the economic ruin and the widespread domestic vio
just said. you said that you had a personal interaction with obama and were very impressed with his ideas and how they fit into a progressive agenda. then those of us that live in the press to the agenda seemed disappointed. but then we also want to present these ideas that he was a very much fighting and coming up against the whole system that we know is in place. perry much discouraged this agenda and the way that we want to presented and the way that many people in this country feel and believe it needs to big balanced. you know, my hope is that he understands all the things that you understand and that the progressives understand in terms of how the system works and it will be dealt with. on some level he has a plan in terms of dealing with the obstruction that he is going to come up with in terms of delivering what it is that we really help from his campaign he was going to be able to deliver and whether or not there should be some hope, i guess, is what i'm looking for, ultimately if he gets another term he will be able to deliver on. >> good question. well said. i think he ca
with the republicans, and by the time barak obama ran for president, they got more, but the price of that was a betrayal of the working class that traditionally the democratic party and liberal institutions had once protected. our great failure for those of us who care about ordinary, the rights of ordinary citizens is that in 1994 with the passage of nafta, we did not stand up for the working class and turn our back on the democratic party. we continued to support democratic politicians who spoke in the traditional language of liberalism, but betrayed every single core liberal value. welfare reform, we now face the prospect with this new midterm election of unemployment benefit s for tens of millions of citizens running out or being allowed to run up without being extended which will mean that many of these people will have to attempt to survive on the $143 a month you receive from welfare curtesy of the democratic party. the deregulation of the banking system, the deregulation of the fcc, i just spent the fall teaching at the university of toronto, and they don't have a banking
i say in the book president obama had an interesting question when he came into office which is how to define the war on terror. i think the liberal side of the democratic party and a lot of europeans would like him to redefine it is a police action against terrorists and that would have been naive on multiple levels. al qaeda has been at war with us since 1998 certainly when the blue of our embassies in africa. the declared war on us and they have done war-like things. on the other hand i think president george w. bush is a cause eye existential conflict which he did nine days after 9/11. al qaeda is a serious problem but it's not more not to communism. i don't think we had the language to explain exactly because it is a form of warfare with the nearest form of warfare in terms of the american historical terms is perhaps the war against the barbary pirates in the 18th-century which is not certainly war but it wasn't an interstate war, and it wasn't to destroy the republican. >> here are a few of the upcoming book fairs and festivals from around the country. he here's a portion of o
hero of modern-day medicine. he was exonerated and had to raise $3 billion. long story. when obama passed a wonderful health care law, there is john dingell standing next to the president and how wonderful. this man probably cause the death of women with breast cancer because the trial was delayed two or three years but then with the health care bill, did anybody question to the doctors were lowered there expertise when betsy macquarie had a forum. >> i am sorry. >> there was a forum here so my question is, what do we do to get trained physicians in public relations to go about it? we do work that nobody knows about. >> i completely agree that the clinicians and scientists are terrible at interacting with the media. i will tell you why and how we can get better part of the reason it is true as a pediatrician, we are nice people. we're not good at confrontation and even bad. a scientist like a -- you're not trained to work with the media you are taught to be critical of your day and circumspect and it is hard to make a definitive statement like mmr causes autism although you can nev
to fight a soviet fighter that was never built because the soviet union fell apart. and something the obama administration ferry much wanted to end the program and members of congress and lockheed martin had other ideas. ultimately lockheed martin lost the battle but it is instructive why they lost, how it was fought. it is a glimpse into the industrial complex at work. and a surprise ending. so i am going to do this by way of some excerpts from my book. this is the very beginning. it is a striking and. and intimidating combat aircraft in the background with the slogan up front in all capital letters. three hundred million protected. 95,000 employed. the ad for lockheed martin's f-22 fighter plane is part of the last gasp effort to save one of its most profitable weapons from being terminated in standard budget parlance. it scores times in print, on political websites, even in washington's metro. one writer at the washington post joked that lockheed martin's bras of full-page ads was the main thing keeping the paper afloat. and jumping ahead of a little bit, as soon as there was even a whis
to then secretary of state thomas jefferson protesting slavery to a letter from alice walker to barack obama the day following his election to the presidency. this 50 a minute that was hosted by new york university in new york city. >> thank you, and thank you for being here. thank you so much to my wonderful friend, thank you also to my dean, richard come into the college for hosting this. thank you all for being here at this time, i'm sure that many things you could be doing, doing homework, faculty grading. and so i'm honored that you chose to be here with us. i will bring up to people who will help me read. lee couric who is also my aunt and an accomplished actress. [applause] >> and joshua who is a junior at the college of arts and science. [applause] >> so, as dean farrington said, this was a labor of love. it's one that for five years i worked on going through archives and in anthologies in attics trying to find the letters of african-americans that could help sketch portraits, intimate portraits of the people from the dusty plantation to the white house with the election of barack obama. and
with the turks and our means at the moment. it's been used all over the place, but we, include barack obama in the week, have not yet learned that negotiation, if negotiation is just marketing, it's just another use of strength. but if negotiation is analysis of the problem, and the development of agreed upon solutions to the problem, it's something entirely different. and until you do that, war is never a last resort. if you haven't tried conflict resolution, you can't say war is a last resort just because negotiations broke down. and one more thing about the thing to get back to question, one more thing about the draft issue, one of the things that i think we have to start facing is that even people, the best intentioned people and the most antiwar people find it difficult to look the economic realities of war in the face. one of the economic realities is that we've been practicing what some people call military teams use them. for the past at least 30 years. maybe longer. ever since world war ii perhaps. military-industrial demand has replaced by keynesian economists and others consider
the economy begins to recover, when the hopes in obama or any other leader begin to fade further, when people become tired of obsessive warfare of what is called the forever war. one could reject a revival of some kind, antiwar sentiment. one of the things that seems to me we can't do, we mustn't do, is to buy into the argument that since there are not many american casualties, comparatively speaking, since thousands of body bags are not coming back from the war zone, we can't accept war as normal with the colonel level of violence, and accept that as normal. and so let me conclude by reading, the conclusion of this book which talks about the fact that death in a morgan -- in american wars are down. but we are seeing horrifying increases and entries generated by asymmetric warfare against hostile groups wielding low-tech weapons, such as improvised explosive devices. american veterans hospitals are jammed with soldiers suffering the effects of severe head injuries, indications and post-traumatic stress. the suicide rate among combat veterans is skyrocketed. furthermore, we have to question th
w. bush, barack obama, americans have been told they are poor because america and its allies are motivated by hatred for liberty, way of life and democratic institutions. this is a palpable, lethal lie. we are being attacked because of our elite half-century we let us intervention the muslim world. it is accumulative impact from the 50 years of interventionism that we find the main motivation of america's islamist enemies as well as the print both organizational glue that provide the monica of unity to the movement always fragile cohesion. the islamist motivation is to be found in their perception of u.s. foreign policy is an attack on the islamic religion and its followers. this is a view held not only by those carrying ak-47s, but extend the polling by a delightful that nearly 80% of all muslims worldwide, young and old, moderate and militant men and women. no american must accept the islamist indictment of the anti-muslim intent of u.s. foreign policies. but to avoid military defeat, economic ruin and widespread domestic violence, u.s. leaders must have knowledge and expla
society. right now in the united states there is an unspoken message that even if what the obama administration and his predecessors have done to redistribute income, the intention is good. it's the greedy bad people that want to stand in the way and impoverish, and stand in the way of getting health care to people who need it, and helping poor people. they are bad. they are selfish. she is saying that's absolute nonsense. the moral case is with the people who want to have economic freedom because economic freedom is ethical. it is good. it makes good people. and it is what good people want. that message has to come out. so in her words, in the end, the real case against socialism is not it's economic inefficiency. though on all sides there is evidence of that. much more fundamental as it's basic morality. this is a point that was made by others and made before. we can all say what the intellectual origins are at this point. it comes from hayek and milton friedman. : >> she was talking to a nation that had already gone very far down this path, and she is able to convince his skep
particularly good on obama's solutions to the recession. but i think it's humanized and brought home the suffering and ordeal that a lot of people are going through. unfortunately, a tide of left liberal, politically correct orthodoxy has caused the paper to drift from political and social information to that of a partisan cheerleader. the editorial panel has always followed it's own agenda. the problem is the perspectives in the editor page has bled over into the news report and are spread between the lines of news reporting. bill keller has said "times" practices verification. i would say it practiced a journalism of values projection. and that bias, there's really no other word for it, has created the journalism at odds with it's historical mission of rendering the mission without fear of favor. it has created journalism at odds with the liberal democratic values it's long stood for. even if you do support a more partisan "times" and there are those they should take up like they do in europe, britain in particular. even if you do support a more partisan "times" and self-identified
a legacy. how much of his committed silence to the policies that the obama has enacted as well as, you know, his -- just his over all demeanor since he left office, isn't that shaping a legacy? how much will that impact our public opinion of him? how much of that will impact the 2012 presidential race? >> okay. around the horn and start with tevi troy. >> you can't blame the president by shaping the legacy by not commenting. i think it's wise and smart. not comment on the current president. because it's not fair. you are the only one who has access to the information that they had. i think the president should stay out of the current politics. i think he's right to do so. >> julian zelizer? >> i think president bush has notably and remarkably silent since he left office. not simply about president bush, but even about the republican party. a lot of the tea party movement, for example, has not been an rebellion against president obama, it's been president bush's policies like t.a.r.p. or the debate over immigration, which matters very much to president bush. an issue that he held dear to his
to the american spectators suggested that the gop recruit president obama into its ranks. mr. stein said it would be a good fit. can you personally strange this strange introduction other conservatives who are so opposed to obama's liberal views, especially obamacare, his economic and his immigration policy? >> i think i explained once ben stein was being ironic. and irony will get you no place in public today, ben so cut out the jokes. >> darcy, mount clemens, michigan. good afternoon. >> caller: i want to you further elaborate how when it comes to the conservatives or if you would like to say the liberals who are now become the progressives, hasn't it always been the conservatives or the right wing who have started these social programs to enhance the lives of the minorities as in abe lincoln, a republican. wasn't it eisenhower who wanted to get the civil rights but it didn't get past until lbj came along? and all those types of deals and as far as being pro-life. they are looking out for the minorities when isn't the it the democratic parties or the progressives aren't they the one funding for
talking about what obama could accomplish with social media and social networks would be instrumental to mobilize. also just with the enthusiasm in my a particular part of the world thought the protest and have been in serbia and georgia and ukraine same thing have been belarus but then the you end up with the assumptions that social media will actually play a huge role in the democratized world. so my first big out of college was the ngo based on using new media also democratic reform sell my eighth job was traveling around and meeting with journalists and talking to them about the media how they can use blogs -- blogs and social networks for those that were very optimist six how they could put the internet to good use. and light publicizing corruption are blocking about the environment and i spent roughly three years doing that finding dose who were eager from the legitimate agenda and with society those who were making assumptions about the power of the internet too and i spent a few years doing that i started seeing not having the desired outcome are making famous worse in part be
and minder standing is a fit into the broader understanding so i think with the action end of obama and the kind of worship that characterized his campaign, i think it was much more over bush in terms itself in 2009 we began seeing this the fact that it weighs on at this point* so than in 2009 or maybe it earlier but then the statements from the state apartment i also talk about it in the book but from january 2010 was the final point* this from this book and this project was the second dimension to examine the government and the internet but the american political establishment thinks of the power of the internet but also thinks how to use the internet for their own agenda. >> host: there is a lot of agitators but when you get around to it in its own way way, the internet free them agenda pushes the initial of freedom agenda in the sense of the unintended consequences of labeling this as a policy, that is something most people are not familiar with that argument. but once they start to wrap their heads around it, have the obama and administration succeeded in politicizing that up u
ratified. i suspect it's on president obama's list down the road, but for now, fortunately, the united states still observes the terms of the agreement and provides funds for the very elaborate program of international investigation that has been installed around the world to track any possible nuclear tests and, indeed, i think was one of the first systems to identify the first north korean test. so with that said, it's interesting to look at what all this cold war cost us. these are numbers that i've converted to 2010 dollars so that the full impact is there. i think the most important number, to me, is the cost of our nuclear weapons and delivery systems, $7.8 trillion. and the cold war total, $18.5 trillion which carl sagan famously said, in other words, everything in the united states except the land. i think we should ask ourselves whether we really needed to spend that much money. it's interesting to see what we, what we didn't do because of that expense, among others. the american society of civil engineers puts out an annual report card on u.s. civil infrastructure. this is th
nominateed. then obama stole my thunder and nominated sotomayor. so i changed it to the second hispanic. >> and what lead you you -- howe you inspired to write this? >> i've been in involved in every -- not every but just about every -- supreme court confirmation battle since '87, i was in the coalition for thetop -- for the thomas nomination really happened. a lot of it happened, some of the dialogue or the meetings either happened during the robert or alito nominations. and i decided to fictionalize it. because i think the confirmation process has become broken. i think what used to be advise and consent is now search and destroy. i think it tends to be one sided. i think it's unfortunate. i wanted to show it in a way that was accessible to the average reader. that's why i chose to do it with fiction. >> where do you see the actual court going? >> well, it depends on what happens in 2012, and it depends on who else retires. i think the general, conventional wisdom, which i tend to subscribe to, you have a forty that's decided 4-4 with justice kennedy. sandra day o'connor used to be th
or confused as to who obama was because i did not vote for him. and it is kind of disappointing fact from a lot of black people's perspectives that they did not except -- expect a lot from obama because of who he played to an office and the bus that you wrote on. that kind of thing and taking reverend wright and everybody black under the bust it was clear from anybody who understood the politics what he was about i would suggest you bookmark black and gender report because everything you said was talked about way back when it is no surprise how he acts because and but either he is smart or he is not smart or a constitutional law professor or he is and. either torture is torture and indefinite detention is indefinite detention. or they are what they are or they are not. >> thank you. >> . . can be proud of and americans can be proud of and the fact he isn't happen to agree with you and reverend wright and lewis with, embrum, yellow, red as 8-liter and wouldn't be seen as such if she held those views so i have to fundamentally disagree that that's the problem. >> thank you for com
people during this recession. i don't think it's been particularly good on obama's solutions to the recession, but i think it is brought home the suffering and the ordeal that a lot of people are going through. unfortunately, the tide of left liberal politically correct orthodoxy has caused the paper to drift from its traditional role of honest broker of important and political social and information to that of a partisan cheerleader. the editorial page has always followed its own agenda. the problem is the perspectives in the editorial page have split into the news report and are spread between the lines of the news reporting. bill keller said the times practices the journalism of verification. i would say that it practices a journalism of values projection. and that by yes deer is really no other word for it has created a journalism at odds with its historical mission of rendering the news in partially without fear or favor. and it's also created journalism at odds with the liberal space values that its long stood for. so even if you do support a more partisan times, and th
the depth and severity of the crisis that you can also understand the difficulties that president obama and others have had in trying to get out of that crisis. it was so severe and so fundamental if markets froze up completely, then you've got a long way back from a situation that was so desperate and so severe. so we restructured the spanks, and then -- banks, and then we decided we would approach all the other countries to do that. and then we decided you've got to refloat the world economy. so how you've got to have -- you've got to have resources in the world economy so it can start to grow again, and then we moved towards what was the april 2009 meeting where we had the g20 set up for the fist first time, and they agreed to underpin the economy. never done before, never tried before, but i think the combined decisions of all these countries -- america, europe and china and india being part of this as well -- meant we avoided what could have been a great depression. we certainly have had a great and terrible recession, but it didn't descend into the great depression that we've with
obama kind of stole my thunder and nominated sotomayor. sonyasonyasonia sotomayor. so i changed it to the second hispanic. >> and, well, what led you -- how did -- how were you inspired to write this? >> well, i've been involved in not every but just about every supreme court confirmation battle since bork in '87. and i was at the christian coalition in the '90s for the thomas nomination, and a lot of what's in the book really happened including some of the dialogue, some of the specific anecdotes, some of the meetings either happened during the roberts or the alito or the bork or the thomas nominations. and i just decided to fictionalize it because i think the confirmation process has really become broken. i think what used to be advise and consent has become search and destroy. there's been an ideological litmus test. i think that tends to be one-sided, frankly, and i think it's unfortunate. and i wanted to show it in a way that was accessible to the average reader, and that's why i chose to do it with fiction. >> and where do you see the actual court going? >> well, it kind o
medicine. not a word. he was totally exonerated, and they fired him. it's a long story. when obama passed his health care law, there was john dingell standing -- i get mad when i say this -- standing next to the president. this man probably caused the deaths of women with breast cancer because the trial was delayed two or three years. and then when obama is passing his wonderful health care bill, he trots out a bunch of pelicans known as doctors in white coats. did anybody ever question who these doctors are, what their ec per tease? when betty mccoy had a forum here in finish. >> i'm sorry, doctor, could you -- >> i'm going to ask a question. my question is, what do we do to get our message across? do we train physicians in public relations? how do we go about it? we are doing work that no one knows about. >> yeah -- >> and we get pushed around. >> i completely agree with you that i think as clinicians and scientists we are terrible at interacting with the media. i'll tell you whey i think -- why i think that is and how i think we can get better at it. i think the reason it's true and ce
.s., when obama passed the wonderful health care law, where is john standing? i get mad when i say this? john dingell is standing next to the president. this man probably caused the death of women with breast cancer because the trial was delayed two or three years. when obama was passion his wonderful health care bill, he trucked out a bunch of pelicans known as doctors in white coats. did they question the expertise? when betsy mccoy had a form in new york? >> i'm sorry. doctor. can you ask a question. >> my question is what do we do to get our message across? train physicians in public relations? how do we go about it? we are doing work that no one knows about. and we get pushed around. >> i completely agree with you that i think as clinicians and scientists we are terrible at interacting with the media. i will tell you why i think that is, and how i think we can get better at it. i think the reason it's true, certainly as a pediatrician, i'm sure you support this, we are nice people. we are not good at confrontation. bad at it even. i think as a scientist, you know, your scientific t
, if -- and this is the thing. if president obama said he wants to get out of both wars, then these tea baggers would sit up here and say -- >> host: all right. tell you what, we've got your side, now let's hear from our guest, r. emmett tyrrell. >> guest: well, first of all, tea bagger's a dirty word of disparagement. if you don't know that, that's what it is. secondly, the best thing i can say about obama is that he's black, and that's a good thing. it's good to have a plaque man president of the -- black man president of the united states. we can put racism behind us. and mainstream america has put racism behind it. and that is a good thing. and so that's where i stand, and as far as this ongoing rant of yours about racism, i'd say that the first person that raises the question of racism in a conversation is often the person who's a racist. >> host: long meadow, massachusetts. frank, you're on with our "in depth" guest on tv as we talk about books and ideas. please go ahead. >> caller: my issue is the debt. for the last 35 years we've collectively spent -- regardless of who was in power -- we have collec
with the action of obama and with the kind of, you know, worship that character sized his campaign, i think there was much more of a push in terms of trying to explore the digital space, you know, more strategically. so in 2009 we began seeing the technology delegations of, you know, american executives going on trips to foreign countries to try to sell american technology to local leaders. and then the first of those who was i think in 2009, could be a bit earlier. then, of course, there was the famous outreach from the state department dealing with protests in iran which i also make a lot of in the book. you know, eventually it all came down to the internet freedom speech of hillary clinton in january 2010 which was just the final point that convinced me that, you know, this book and this project, it had a dimension which is not just examining how goths respond to the internet -- governments respond to the internet, but how the american government and the american political establishment thinks about the power of the internet, but also think thinks about howe the internet for their own ag
obliterate it. of course, president obama will veto it. if they have a two-thirds vote they can override. or they can wait until they have a president who is with them. that is no way to get things done, and that fortunately was what henry clay understood. because a situation presented itself in 1850, in which the country having defeated mexico, tour from mexico california, new mexico, present states, arizona, wyoming, parts of colorado, utah, and enormous tract of land. and the south, having done so much to acquire that territory, felt that it had a right to bring its slaves into that territory. slavery was protected under the constitution. and what makes the constitution so remarkable is that it is nothing more than a package of compromises, on almost everything. they disagreed, you take any issue, there would be disagreement. and if one side imposes its will, it's not going to last. you have to get both sides to agree. how do you do that? henry clay argued that in a real compromise there are no losers. everybody, every side has to feel that there is something that they are getting, th
question i was wondering what you think of the current foreign policy of the west, both the obama administration and people like president sarkozy, what is your feeling about what the west is doing now with russia? >> yes, of course, we feel a little -- [inaudible] on by the intellectuals. we failed to attract attention of the authorities and change some things that we investigate. we can -- [inaudible] and nobody pay attention. sometimes it might be some forcible actions against -- [inaudible] for example. some criminal cases or interrogations, but in general nobody pay attention to our investigations. and the situation is that the -- [inaudible] have now entered the -- [inaudible] because there was a problem. >> be and about foreign governments, i think while it was surprise for us because it's one of the big problems, big issues of the book that we tried to write about it. in the early 2000s and the late 1990s we fought -- [inaudible] experts and dissidents fought what we see kind of kgb revival, and this new power, putin, might change the whole country, economic rules. but, in
millions and millions of people, just as president obama. really back in 2000 when george bush was running against al gore, poor ratings for much higher. after bush appeared
later as an amendment to the defense appropriations act. president obama cited one year ago this month. the language specifically forbids regarding the apology as a basis for any sort of monetary compensation. to sum up here is what i've taken away from the experience. sometimes because of panic and greed human beings and we americans are certainly human may act against our own high principles. eventually remorse will assert itself and the form of what lincoln memorably called our better. those will insist that we live up to our ideals. to still our conscience we may tender an apology. it will always be too late and it will always be inadequate. bearing that in mind i believe we must resist every effort to demonize the mexicans without papers with the muslims living peacefully in our midst. if we insist on laboring them all as a drug lords are terrorists we're simply guaranteeing that one day our grandchildren will have to apologize for our blindness and a tree. i hope we don't pass on to them that burden. and of my sermon. thank you for listening, and now it's my turn to hear what you
into was an issue because my former student and our president, barack obama, came to his defense and that created a national issue. but since i write a lot about issues of race and justice it was a natural thing to do, and i wanted people to say professor bates can get a vested in such regions like this when it gives to forms of ied in his own house and the only crime is arguing the police officer in his house what happens to those who don't have a lawyer and have power and the six blowers that case and the broad issue that profiling has happened through the nation's history. >> did you learn anything this surprise you when you were researching the book? >> the first is interesting. everyone thought the woman who were originally called, her name was lucille, was the nosy neighbor, she was racial profiling. in fact when we got the transcript what we learned she is the hero, i see people, calling, but i don't know if they live there or work there, but for the white, black or hispanic? she said i don't know i think one is hispanic but i don't know. the police officer report says the black machine ev
to recover, when the hopes in obama or any other leader begin to fade further, when people become tired of incessant warfare of what is called the forever war, one could predict a revival of some kind of anti-war sentiment. one of the things that it seems to me we can't do, we mustn't do is to buy into the argument that since there are not many american casualties comparatively speaking, since thousands of body bags aren't coming back from the war zone we can accept war as normal with the current level of violence and accept that as normal. and so let me conclude by reading the conclusion of this book which talks about the fact that deaths in american wars are down, but we are seeing horrifying increases in injuries generated by asymmetric warfare against hostile groups wielding low-tech weapons such as improvised explosive devices. american veterans' hospitals are jammed with soldiers suffering the effects of severe head injuries, amputations and post-traumatic stress. and the suicide rate among combat veterans has skyrocketed. furthermore, we have to question the official definitions
? historically has been the case that people of my age, barack obama is the first president that i am older than, so it's roughly people my age who make the decision to send people their age to war. and i asked them, so why do you do it? and i pose some answers and i said okay, these are some possible answers. i don't pretend that there is a single answer by any year in this regard i remind them that history and human affairs are not like us. were asked is if you want to reduce the number of answers. you want to reduce the number of causes. in history, the more answer you can give a more complete your explanation is. because if there is an army of about 10,000 or 10 they are 12 in a 60 million as the wasn't one or two, they're almost as many reasons why you go to war. one of the possibilities i presented to them is that maybe we choose, that is weak, i'm calling myself the generation decision-maker, we are very clever at pulling the wool over the eyes of these young and gullible generations. and we give them to do our dirty work. so we said we are going to war and you guys go off to work. i say
president, barack obama, came to his defense, and that created a national issue that led to the beer summit. it was a natural thing to do, and i wanted people to say if professor gates can get arrested in situations like this when he gives two forms of id in his house and his only crime is arguing with the police officer in his house, then what happens to those who don't have a lawyer, who don't have power? and the this book explores that case, but it mothers -- explores the broader issue of racial profiling. >> did you learn anything that surprised you while you were researching the book? >> everyone thought that the woman who originally called was the nosey neighbor, she was racially profiling. in fact, when we got the 911 transcript what did we learn? she is the hero. she says, i see people, i'm calling, but i don't know if they live there or work there. the dispatcher said are they white, black or hispanic? she said, i don't know, i think one's hispanic. the police report says they're black, she never said that. so all these things we thought we knew in 2009, investigation, research and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)